Limited Access to E-Z Borrow 7/23-7/28

Users may experience limited access to E-Z Borrow between 5:00 PM today, July 23rd until Monday, July 28th due to the library system upgrade project. If this occurs, please use ILLiad to request items as an alternative. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please feel free to contact the E-ZBorrow office at 412-396-6127 or the Reference Desk at 412-396-6133 with any questions.

"If you are an editor on the English Wikipedia, you might have noticed the recent uptick in announcements for accounts offered by The Wikipedia Library! The Wikipedia Library gives active, experienced Wikipedia editors free access to a wide range of paywalled databases – reliable sources that are vital for their work (see also: “The Wikipedia Library Strives for Open Access“). We have been having a lot of success meeting the goals of ourIndividual Engagement Grant from the Wikimedia Foundation. Established partnerships, like that with JSTOR, are expanding, getting Wikipedia editors more access to high quality research materials! Moreover, because of those successes, we are having many fruitful discussions with organizations large and small that are interested in helping Wikipedians create public knowledge and link Wikipedia in to the larger network of scholarly source materials.

We surveyed Wikipedia users interested in the Wikipedia Library about which sources would be best for us to get access to, and one from that list, British Newspaper Archive, has been a very active recent success. It started with 50 accounts and has since expanded to 100 because of the enthusiasm in the initial sign-up period. An archive of high-quality scans of newspapers from the collection of the British Library, it provides a great source of reference materials for Wikipedia articles about 18th, 19th, and early 20th century Britain and its global interests. Even though the accounts have only been available for a couple of weeks, Wikipedians have been successfully using them to create new and expand old articles about historical topics, both about local history and topics of national British interest. These range from articles about geographical features (Swithland Reservoir) to sports (1884 FA Cup Final and Jack Kid Berg), coal mines (Pendleton Colliery) to politicians (Sewallis Shirley).”

White fell in love with the movie “The Raiders of the Lost Ark” when he saw it as a boy. “

I looked at Harrison Ford and thought, ‘That’s what I want to do when I grow up,’ ” he said.

While Mr. White might not have a role as glamorous as the one played by Mr. Ford, he did grow up to explore legends and folklores. The West View resident serves as an archivist and curator at Duquesne University and, in his spare time, researches “unexplained and unanswered things.”

The author of eight books about local history, legends and myths, Mr. White recently was selected by the American Association for State and Local History for a Leadership in History Award. He received an Award of Merit for his book, Witches of Pennsylvania: Occult History and Lore.

Yep, that’s our archivist! :)

Swing by the 5th floor today for a panel discussion on art, health, and culture. Nursing and Communication & Rhetorical Studies faculty members will discuss spirituality in sickness, transcultural views of illness, and how individuals make meaning of suffering. Join us 4:30-6pm! Details and registration: http://bit.ly/1jysuYQ

Swing by the 5th floor today for a panel discussion on art, health, and culture. Nursing and Communication & Rhetorical Studies faculty members will discuss spirituality in sickness, transcultural views of illness, and how individuals make meaning of suffering. Join us 4:30-6pm! 

Details and registration: http://bit.ly/1jysuYQ

Read the full article via the Washington Post.

In 2013, the editor of JVC, Ali H. Nayfeh, became aware of people using “fabricated identities” to manipulate an online system called SAGE Track by which scholars review the work of other scholars prior to publication.

Attention focused on a researcher named Peter Chen of the National Pingtung University of Education (NPUE) in Taiwan and “possibly other authors at this institution.”

After a 14-month investigation, JVC determined the ring involved “aliases” and fake e-mail addresses of reviewers — up to 130 of them — in an apparently successful effort to get friendly reviews of submissions and as many articles published as possible by Chen and his friends. “On at least one occasion, the author Peter Chen reviewed his own paper under one of the aliases he created,” according to the SAGE announcement.

Such fraud and deception in the scholarly realm is hard to swallow. We rely on peer-reviewed publications to uphold the integrity of information that we use to make critical decisions and advance society. However, this is peer review ring is not the only form of deception occurring in the world of scholarly publishing. The rise of predatory publishers presents another form of deceit that directly affects scholars. Learn more about these predatory publishers and how to avoid them.

The new age of preservation. Interesting!